Commit 90f2447d authored by Jesper Juhl's avatar Jesper Juhl Committed by Linus Torvalds
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[PATCH] Documentation: Small applying-patches.txt update



Minor update to Documentation/applying-patches.txt
Signed-off-by: default avatarJesper Juhl <jesper.juhl@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
parent 44fce35f
......@@ -2,7 +2,8 @@
Applying Patches To The Linux Kernel
------------------------------------
(Written by Jesper Juhl, August 2005)
Original by: Jesper Juhl, August 2005
Last update: 2005-12-02
......@@ -118,7 +119,7 @@ wrong.
When patch encounters a change that it can't fix up with fuzz it rejects it
outright and leaves a file with a .rej extension (a reject file). You can
read this file to see exactely what change couldn't be applied, so you can
read this file to see exactly what change couldn't be applied, so you can
go fix it up by hand if you wish.
If you don't have any third party patches applied to your kernel source, but
......@@ -127,7 +128,7 @@ and have made no modifications yourself to the source files, then you should
never see a fuzz or reject message from patch. If you do see such messages
anyway, then there's a high risk that either your local source tree or the
patch file is corrupted in some way. In that case you should probably try
redownloading the patch and if things are still not OK then you'd be advised
re-downloading the patch and if things are still not OK then you'd be advised
to start with a fresh tree downloaded in full from kernel.org.
Let's look a bit more at some of the messages patch can produce.
......@@ -180,9 +181,11 @@ wish to apply.
Are there any alternatives to `patch'?
---
Yes there are alternatives. You can use the `interdiff' program
(http://cyberelk.net/tim/patchutils/) to generate a patch representing the
differences between two patches and then apply the result.
Yes there are alternatives.
You can use the `interdiff' program (http://cyberelk.net/tim/patchutils/) to
generate a patch representing the differences between two patches and then
apply the result.
This will let you move from something like 2.6.12.2 to 2.6.12.3 in a single
step. The -z flag to interdiff will even let you feed it patches in gzip or
bzip2 compressed form directly without the use of zcat or bzcat or manual
......@@ -197,7 +200,7 @@ do the additional steps since interdiff can get things wrong in some cases.
Another alternative is `ketchup', which is a python script for automatic
downloading and applying of patches (http://www.selenic.com/ketchup/).
Other nice tools are diffstat which shows a summary of changes made by a
Other nice tools are diffstat which shows a summary of changes made by a
patch, lsdiff which displays a short listing of affected files in a patch
file, along with (optionally) the line numbers of the start of each patch
and grepdiff which displays a list of the files modified by a patch where
......@@ -258,7 +261,7 @@ $ patch -p1 -R < ../patch-2.6.11.1 # revert the 2.6.11.1 patch
# source dir is now 2.6.11
$ patch -p1 < ../patch-2.6.12 # apply new 2.6.12 patch
$ cd ..
$ mv linux-2.6.11.1 inux-2.6.12 # rename source dir
$ mv linux-2.6.11.1 linux-2.6.12 # rename source dir
The 2.6.x.y kernels
......@@ -433,7 +436,11 @@ $ cd ..
$ mv linux-2.6.12-mm1 linux-2.6.13-rc3-mm3 # rename the source dir
This concludes this list of explanations of the various kernel trees and I
hope you are now crystal clear on how to apply the various patches and help
testing the kernel.
This concludes this list of explanations of the various kernel trees.
I hope you are now clear on how to apply the various patches and help testing
the kernel.
Thank you's to Randy Dunlap, Rolf Eike Beer, Linus Torvalds, Bodo Eggert,
Johannes Stezenbach, Grant Coady, Pavel Machek and others that I may have
forgotten for their reviews and contributions to this document.
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